Urban Survivors

You cannot lock up life. It will erupt somewhere. My chalk pastel-tempera painting ‘Urban Survivor’.

Shorena Ratiani Art 
Title: Urban Survivors
Medium: Tempera and chalk pastel on paper
Dimensions: 50 X 70 cm (20″ X 28″)

Have a look at close-up pictures:

I hope you found something interesting while you were here. Don’t hesitate to email me if you have any questions! My contact information can be found on my ‘Keep in Touch’ page.

Come back soon and bring your friends here by sharing.

XOXO

Shorena

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‘High’ secrets of Morning Glory

Morning glory, botanically known as Ipomoea, is one of my favorite flowers. It’s super easy to grow and doesn’t require too much care – just perfect for lazy gardeners.

dark blue morning glory plant
© Shorena Ratiani Photography

You can grow it from seed. For better results, seeds can be nicked and soaked in water for 24 hours before planting.

The most popular varieties of morning glory plants are native to Japan or Mexico and largely grown in North America and Europe.

dark blue morning glory
© Shorena Ratiani Photography

If your new morning glory plant hasn’t flowered yet, be patient. Morning glories can take a couple of months, up to 120 days from seed to flower, to burst out in blooms, especially if you planted the vine from seed.

© Shorena Ratiani Photography

But this beautiful climbing plant has its secrets.

Eating morning glory flowers is not dangerous, however the seeds can be poisonous, especially in large quantities. Morning glory seeds can get you high because they contain LSA, a chemical similar to LSD.

Typically, eating morning glory seeds is not dangerous, but in large enough quantities, they can cause hallucinations, physical symptoms such as nausea and diarrhea, and overdose.

morning glory
© Shorena Ratiani Photography

Have a look at my morning glory gallery – I found dark and light purple, and also pink flowers during my photo walks.

Dog Rose facts and photos

Rosa Canina, commonly known as the dog rose, is a one of the most widespread wild roses in Europe, northwest Africa, and western Asia.

This climbing plant grows 3 to 16 feet tall, or sometimes even more as it can scramble higher on taller trees. 

The name dog rose (bot. Rosa Canina) comes from the belief in the 18th century that it was effective in the treatment of rabid dogs. Another reason given is that the term ‘dog’ has a negative meaning, and as many people thought this plant was inferior to garden roses they called it a dog rose. I don’t really agree with this explanation – dog roses are as beautiful and as soft as garden roses.

The dog-rose is a deciduous shrub that has medicinal uses: the petals, rose hips and galls are astringent, diuretic, laxative, ophthalmic and a tonic. The syrup made from rose hips is taken internally for the treatment of colds, influenza, minor infectious diseases, scurvy, diarrhea and gastritis.

The Dog-rose usually grows up to three metres high. It can stretch that little bit taller with some help! Its sharp spines can grip onto a tree for support.

The dog-rose has oval leaves with jagged edges. The leaves have a sweet scent when rubbed. 

Its white or pink flowers open out from June to July and have a light scent which is loved by bees, butterflies and other insects.

Red egg-shaped fruits grow from October to November. These are called ‘hips’. They are a very important food for birds during the winter and also often used for medicinal purposes.

Did you know that dog-rose hips have lots of vitamin C? They are used to make tea and syrup. 

Here are my photos of white and pink dog rose flowers.